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Sandhill Crane Festival

November 4-6 · Hutchins Street Square · Lodi, CA

November 4-6, 2016

Hutchins Street Square · Lodi, CA

800-581-6150 · info@cranefestival.com

Featured Speakers

Owl: A Year in Their Lives

Saturday, November 5, 2016
12:30-1:20 PM
Crete Hall, Hutchins Street Square, Lodi, CA

Photographer Paul Bannick uses his intimate yet dramatic images to share a year in the lives of North American Owls through four distinct habitats.  Each stage in an owl’s life is chronicled: courtship, mating, and nesting in spring; fledging and feeding of young in summer; dispersal and learning independence in fall; and, finally, winter’s migration.  More than just a backdrop, the four featured owl habitats – forest, grassland and steppe, boreal, and Arctic – reveal wildly rich stories of their own.

Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls is a new stunning follow-up book to Bannick’s bestselling The Owl and the Woodpecker, giving bird lovers yet another gorgeous photographic tribute and a compelling call to preserve the habitats that sustain these most iconic of birds.  Paul will be selling and signing his books in the Exhibit Hall during the Sandhill Crane Festival.

Paul Bannick is an award-winning and widely published wildlife photographer specializing in the natural history of North America with a focus on birds and habitat.  He has received the Canon Prize of the International Conservation Photography Awards, as well as first place in the “Birds and Their Habitat” category in Audubon magazine's annual contest.  He lives in Seattle; learn more at www.paulbannick.com.

 

Owl: A Year in The Lives of North American Owls
Paul Bannick
Available in October 2016
“For anyone who appreciates wild things and wild places, each of Paul Bannick’s stunning photographs is worth ten thousand words.”
– Ted Williams, Audubon
In Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls, award-winning photographer Paul Bannick uses his intimate yet dramatic images to illustrate four different nesting owl species Northern Pygmy, Burrowing, Great Gray, and Snowy throughout the course of the year in four distinct habitats.  Each stage in an owl’s life is chronicled: courtship, mating, and nesting in spring; fledging and feeding of young in summer; dispersal and learning independence in fall; and, finally, winter’s migration.  Unusual irruptions and the everyday struggle to survive are also covered.

In addition to the four featured owls, the fifteen other species of North American owls are generously depicted throughout the book; Bannick’s startling images reflect their shared behaviors as well as some surprising exceptions and adaptations.

224 pages, 103⁄4 x 91⁄2, 200 color photos, color maps, hardcover, $34.95, ISBN 978-1-59485-800-0.

 

An Ethiopian in the Delta: Sandhill Cranes, Corn, and the Struggle to Find Balance in a Complicated World

Sunday, November 6, 2015
12:30-1:20 PM
Crete Hall, Hutchins Street Square, Lodi, CA


Dawit Zeleke with The Nature Conservancy will share the challenges and successes he has experienced managing Staten Island, a 9,300-acre farm that supports Sandhill Cranes, waterfowl, shorebirds, and other wildlife while it competes to be economically viable.  His presentation highlights the real-life struggles in finding equilibrium between interagency cooperation, food production, and the need to conserve our resources.  Dawit will also discuss his journey from Ethiopia to the Cosumnes River and Staten Island.

Dawit Zeleke is Senior Advisor for Conservation and Agriculture with The Nature Conservancy.  Born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, he immigrated to the United States in 1976 and earned a BA in Cultural Anthropology from Friends World College in Huntington, New York.  Dawit has worked for The Nature Conservancy for 24 years and currently manages Staten Island in Walnut Grove, where he is responsible for setting the strategic vision for their wildlife friendly farming operation.  With over 20 years of agriculture, habitat management, and habitat restoration experience, Dawit serves as an internal resource to conservation programs and initiatives.  Dawit and his wife Cori own and operate Capay Satsuma Mandarins, a certified organic orchard.  Dawit enjoys international travel, especially to Eastern and Southern Africa, and he is an avid fly fisherman.